Numbers and Values

50 collage

$50. What is that worth?  Its not a trick question.  The value of anything is what people are willing to do for it.  If you make $10/hour, $50 is pretty much a full-day of work.  If you make $100/hour, its only 30 minutes, and probably isn’t as valuable.  What if you make $2/day?  Then you’re looking at almost a full month of work.  $50 is very quickly worth a lot more.

13.  A number that is misunderstood.  There’s even a real phobia – triskaidekaphobia.  Elevators don’t have a number 13. Most high-rises skip from the 12th to the 14th floor. In Jewish culture it is the age of maturity when boys and girls demonstrate they are becoming men and women. 13 is just the between of 12 and 14.

I am at the intersection of 13 and $50.  I’m thirteen $50/month supporters away from being “fully funded” to return to Kenya.  For me that $50/month means being able to pay my health insurance bill, a third of my monthly grocery bill, a pair of glasses, a trip to the dentist, internet accessibility… Each $50 is very precious and appreciated.

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Thanks!

Oh – if you’re into my brand of pondering, check the almost daily mini-musings at blipfoto.

Being grateful

Its raining again, I could complain about the mud, cold and inconvenience caused by the rain, but I won’t.  Instead I will be grateful and pray that it rains in areas other than Nairobi so that there will be abundant food crops and water to drink.

I’ve lost weight.  Instead of complaining about the fact that my clothes are too big, or that I have to deal with the hassle of taking them to the tailor to be reduced, I will appreciate the fact that I can afford to do it, and that I have clothes.

water bottle sandals

photo courtesy of Facebook

Take a look at social media and you’ll find many people counting down the days, or using the alphabet to share what they are thankful for.  Here in Kenya, there are reminders each and every time I walk out of my door. God’s grace and mercy have placed me where I can feast in the midst of famine, water in the wasteland, plenty amongst poverty.

Yes, we Americans take one day in November to remember to give thanks for the abundant blessings in our lives and this is good.  Yet in the midst of the feast on your table remember not everyone can enjoy what you do.  The news is reporting stories of people in New England still without power because of the early snow, one lady even saying she felt “abandoned.”  I’ll admit I didn’t have a lot of sympathy for her, in fact my reaction was to comment “Stop being selfish & make your life about others.”

Those that are in lack are not just here in Kenya or Africa.  A friend posted a blog about comparing the lines for a homeless shelter vs. a gourmet donut shop.  So this November and the coming holiday season can I encourage you to make your life about others?  You can give your cash – that’s sometimes easier, but I encourage you to give of your time and talent too.  Because just maybe, those that seem to have nothing will give something back to you.